Ceramic Upgrade

Brands we carry:

Arizona Tile
Dal Tile
Emser Tile
Mohawk & more

Ceramic tile is manufactured from clay materials that are quarried, prepared, and then formed into a mold. Common forming methods for ceramic tile include dry press, extruded, and slush mold. The dry press forming method involves a mixture of dry material being pressed into a mold under extreme pressure. Extruded ceramic tile is formed when a mixture of slightly wet material is extruded into a mold. Slush mold is a forming method in which a mixture of very wet material is poured into a mold and then hardened in a kiln at an extremely high temperature.
Porcelain vs. Non-Porcelain

Ceramic tile can best be characterized as either porcelain or non-porcelain. Traditional ceramic tile is non-porcelain and is made from white, red, and/or brown clay and other minerals. Porcelain ceramic tile is made from clay and minerals as well, but it also contains 50% of a white dust or sand called feldspar. Feldspar is a type of crystal found in rock that acts as a “flux” during the kiln-drying process, melting into a glass-like material and bonding all of the molded ingredients together. Minor modifications to the ingredients of ceramic tile or the kiln-drying process (i.e., to the temperature and type of kiln) create enormous variety in the appearance and characteristics of manufactured ceramic tile flooring products.

Porcelain and non-porcelain ceramic tile can be either unglazed or glazed. Glazed tile has a matte, semi-gloss, or high-gloss finish applied to the surface during the manufacturing process. In the past, glazed tile was kiln-fired twice, once to harden the tile mold and a second time to harden the glaze. Today, in addition to double-fired ceramic tiles, an automated single-fired manufacturing process called Monocuttura hardens a glazed mold in one step. Glazed tiles have increased stain resistance, scratch resistance, and traction, as well as decreased water absorption, in comparison to an unglazed tile.

Non-porcelain, ceramic tile is among the most economical types of tile flooring. Porcelain ceramic flooring is more expensive than non-porcelain and can be harder to work with. However, it offers greater durability, natural stain resistance, minimal water absorption, and through-bodied color. Many types of tile are manufactured in a similar fashion to ceramic tile, but they are less common. These include brick, cement, glass, encaustic, saltillo, and terra cotta tile. The varying materials and manufacturing processes create distinctive product characteristics.

Porcelain and Ceramic tile floors are an excellent alternative to hardwood and carpet flooring.

Tiles have the cool beauty and surface feel of natural stone, and they’re durable, easily maintained and less costly than stone.

Tile flooring has a polished, smooth-finished grandeur that resonates color depth and captures the intricate design details of veins and pores seen in natural stones.

Tile ideas are endless for the bathroom, kitchen flooring, or any indoor or outdoor area where the decor of the room is highlighted by flooring and window treatments.

Versatility for any style

Ceramic tile is a great flooring option if you are looking for something that is very durable, easy to clean and resistant to stains. It is perfect for kitchens, bathrooms, foyers, laundry rooms or even your higher traffic living areas.

Ceramic is moisture-resistant, so it won’t get ruined when it gets wet. It is very easy to maintain and can easily last for many years in your home.

Ceramic options for you

Ceramic tile comes in many different colors, patterns, textures, and sizes, allowing you to easily customize the look of your home without spending a fortune.

You can keep the look simple with neutrals that match any type of décor, or go for a deeper, darker color for a more modern look. The possibilities are endless.

Natural Stone Tile

Natural stone tile is produced from natural materials that are quarried, slabbed, finished, and cut to size. Common types of stone used as flooring tile include granite, marble, limestone (including travertine), and slate. Among these types of natural stone are thousands of varieties with characteristics that depend on where and when the stone was quarried.

Granite is a type of igneous rock that is very dense and hard. Its distinctive appearance is due to speckled minerals found within the rock, its unique veining, and the thousands of available colors. Granite is nearly impervious and, once it is polished, resists scratching. It is an excellent choice for flooring in kitchens and high-traffic areas.

Marble is a type of metamorphic rock that has rich veining and is available in a variety of colors. Marble is more porous than granite and is not recommended for kitchen flooring unless honed and then sealed on a regular basis.

Limestone is a type of sedimentary rock that offers an earthy appearance in both light and dark shades. The surface can be textured or polished smooth. Limestone is less dense than granite and marble. It can be easily stained and is also prone to scratching. It is not recommended for kitchen or high-traffic flooring applications.

Travertine is a type of limestone that offers an unusual crystallized appearance with an earthy tone. Travertine is a soft, porous stone with a natural surface that has pitting or divots. A honed or polished surface can be achieved after filling the surface voids. Travertine is not recommended for kitchen floors, as it can be easily scratched and stained. Special care and surface sealing is required to maintain travertine.

Slate is a type of metamorphic rock that is extremely dense and very durable. Slate is available in darker earthy tones. The surface of slate is naturally textured unless a smooth, honed finish is achieved. Slate is an excellent choice for kitchen and high-traffic area flooring.

Come to us for fast and reliable installation that’s performed to your standards using only the best names in ceramic tile.